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Join my team - we are hiring a Technical Evangelist

This is really a dream job for a technology enthusiast. Send your resume or LinkedIn profile to me here - http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikebz or @mikebz on twitter

Technical Evangelist Job Description

Location: Seattle, WA or San Fancisco, CA
Travel Time: 25%

DocuSign is looking for a technical visionary to join our Technical Evangelism Team.

The mission of a Technical Evangelist (TE) is to win adoption of DocuSign technologies through talks, articles, blogging, user demonstrations and creation of sample projects. TE is involved in mutually beneficial alliances that drive revenue growth and expand DocuSign usage in partners offerings.

A successful TE would be able to articulate the benefits of DocuSign service to a wide variety of audiences from CTO to an individual Software Engineer. Internally TE’s responsibility would be to influence DocuSign product strategy through knowledge of software vendors, system integrators and technological landscape.

The position will be measured by:
1) DocuSign API and protocol adoption in the marketplace
2) DocuSign service awareness among outside software developers
3) Partner satisfaction
4) Revenue resulting from integrated solutions

Position Requirements:

1) Passion for learning new technologies in various technology stacks: Windows, Linux, iPhone, Android and others.
2) Existing knowledge of how to create solution in 2 or more of the technology stacks using various programming languages such as: C#, VB.NET, PHP, Java, JavaScript, Apex Code and Ruby on Rails
3) Communication experience needs to include public speaking, writing and social media
4) Personality: positive attitude, ability to energize software developers and IT professionals, fair and balanced approach to technology.
5) Education: Bachelor of Science in Computer Science or Computer Engineering is required. Graduate degree in business or computer science is a plus.
6) Language: Must be fluent in English both verbal and written.
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