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Leaving Microsoft

Some of you might know this, some might not so here is the major announcement: I am leaving Microsoft.

First of all I want to tell you what I am going to be doing next. I am going to be an Engagement Manager working for DocuSign, Inc. You can check out more about the company on this website: www.docusign.com

What exactly will my job entail?
I will be managing projects which interface with DocuSign partners. It's going to be part professional services that DocuSign can bill for and part technical evangelism for other companies to use DocuSign technology.

I will also be travelling mostly to New York, San Francisco, Texas and North Carolina.

Why is this a step up for me when compared to my Microsoft gig?
First because it's a position where I can utilize my customer facing skills as well as my technology skills. Secondly because I will be working with Tom Gonser an entrepreneur and a person I respect for being able to put together businesses. Thirdly it's because both the base pay and the potential for me to make millions are greatly increased at DocuSign.

Microsoft is a great company for someone who wants to drill in deep into technology and it's also a very stable company where the benefits are great. I don't have a family and I rarely get really sick so I am effectively subsidizing benefits and "work/life" balance of 40 year old Microsofties. This is the time for me to get out, take risks and try to make a name for myself.

I do love the team I was working on at Microsoft. Windows Media Center is a great product and we all made it even better! Now it's time for me to kick butt and create something at DocuSign. The impact is going to be less global, but I am confident that with the team we have at one point in time it will be a global impact company. Online legally binding signatures are the WAY TO GO.
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