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What did Steve Jobs mean to me?

This afternoon I saw a tweet that Steve Jobs passed away.  I thought it was a joke.  I thought that @AP is going to include a follow up apologizing for a hack... that message didn't come.  What came was an article in Seattle PI and then a page on Apple.com simply stating "Steve Jobs, 1955-2011"

I wasn't there when we lost John Lennon, but now I know how it feels.  A visionary who has propelled the entire world with his ideas is no longer here.  Who knows what would happen if...

Now we, in the tech industry, are left to carry the torch of innovation and uncompromising focus on user experience in our products.  Steve proved everyone wrong time after time and built a company that has disrupted so many things we thought could not possibly change.

Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains


Thank you Steve!  I will now go do that.
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