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Google Plus could be the first PRM (Personal Relationship Manager)

My toolkit

Last night I was at a great API meetup put together by Shanley (@shanley) from ApiGee.  There were a few interesting presenters including and Context.IO.  Thinking about CRM, extracting useful content out of e-mail and playing with Google Plus gave me an idea:

One thing that I love in the corporate world that is not yet in my consumer arsenal is a relationship manager.  By that I mean the organized view of: e-mails, phone calls, meetups, personal meetings, group affiliations, shared documents and shared pictures all in one view.

I really don’t need a relationship manager for people I stay in close contact with.  I know exactly what my relationship with my mom is about and I know what’s going on with my close friends.  However there is a distant fringe of people that I come in contact with every once in a while.  It would be great to have a view of our history together.  Under that category I would put: ex co-workers, tax accountants, dentists, doctors, car repair people, some of my college buddies and technical affiliates.

There are only a few companies out there that can actually gather that information and organize it.  I believe Google is in the position to do it well.  In fact creating the PRM would elevate the value of using Google voice, sharing Google docs, joining Google groups and, of course, using Google Plus. 
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