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Hiring: Technical Evangelist in San Francisco / Bay Area

Technical Evangelist

DocuSign, Inc.
San Francisco, CA, United States

A successful TE would be able to articulate the benefits of DocuSign service to a wide variety of audiences from CTO to an individual Software Engineer. Internally TE’s responsibility would be to influence DocuSign product strategy through knowledge of software vendors, system integrators and technological landscape.

The position will be measured by:
1) DocuSign API and protocol adoption in the marketplace
2) DocuSign service awareness among outside software developers
3) Partner satisfaction
4) Revenue resulting from integrated solutions

Position Requirements:

1) Self-direction and proven ability to identify technical trends.
2) Passion for learning new technologies in various technology stacks: Linux,, iPhone, Android and others.
3) Existing knowledge of how to create a solution in 2 or more of the technology stacks using various programming languages such as: PHP, Python, Ruby, Java and Apex Code.
4) At least 3 years of commercial experience as a Software Engineer, Product Manager or Program Manager.
5) Communication experience with a record of public speaking, writing, Facebook, twitter and blogging on technical topics.
6) Personality: positive attitude, ability to energize software developers and IT professionals, fair and balanced approach to technology.
7) Education: Bachelor of Science in Computer Science or Computer Engineering is required. Graduate degree in business or computer science is a plus.
8) Language: Must be fluent in English both verbal and written.
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